20090417-19_Peak District Weekend – An Overview

20090417-19_Peak District Weekend – An Overview

When : 17th to 19th April 2009

Who : A group of young people on an outdoor activities weekend including me helping out with adult leadership and supervision.

Where : Hope Valley, Derbyshire, Peak District, England.

I was asked to help out with adult supervision and leadership of a couple or three walks for some young people from a local youth group (for want of a better description). I’ll not be any more specific than that, as to who they are, where they meet, etc., besides it’s not overly relevant to the walks anyway. You’ll also note that none of the attached photo’s in the following posts shows any of the young people …. This is purely down to not having specific permissions from any of their parents/guardians etc., but again, that shouldn’t make any difference to my walks writings, and the scenery walked through is quite superb without pic’s of people getting in the way.

The week-end was to consist of three activities: – Off Road Cycling, Rock Climbing and a bit of Hill Walking.

These were to be spread over three sessions: – Sat-Morning, Sat-Afternoon and Sun-Morning, and three groups were organised to rotate around the activities … Simple.

As it happened, I ended up doing the same walk twice, with the two youngest groups on the Sat and Sun mornings. However, the older group had enough leaders amongst themselves and they decided they didn’t need my services, nor that of another adult helper …. so, we two extraneous chaps set off to do a walk just by ourselves on the Saturday afternoon. I could have tried to combine the three walks, as it could be written as a single linear route … however I’ve decided to keep it simple and write-up the walks just as I did them, as three separate stand alone posts. Each of the walks could be used as the basis of a circular quite easily.

Walk-1 … 20090418-Morning Walk – The Mam Tor Ridge.

Including :- Mam Tor, Hollins Cross, Back Tor, Lose Hill (Ward’s Piece), Castleton, Pindale Farm Camp Site (near Hope Cement Works).

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/24/20090418-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton/

 

Walk-2 … 20090418-Afternoon Walk – Win Hill.

 Including :- Pindale Farm Camp Site (near Hope Cement Works), Hope Village, Twitchill Farm, Win Hill, Winhill Plantation + Parkin Clough, Derwent Valley + Ladybower Reservoir Dam, Bamford Edge.

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/20090418_win-hill-ladybower-bamford-rocks-walk/

 

Walk-3 … 20090419-Morning Walk – The Mam Tor Ridge.

 Including :- Mam Tor, Hollins Cross, Back Tor, Lose Hill (Ward’s Piece), Castleton, Pindale Farm Camp Site (near Hope Cement Works) … (A reprise of Walk-1)

 https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/23/20090419-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton-reprise/

If you’re wondering about where we stayed; it was at Pindale Farm Outdoor Centre/Campsite, where we used the bunk-barn accommodation.

For more info see my associated post.

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/20/20090417-19_peak-district-weekend-accommodation/

Anyway, enough of the pre-amble …. except to say that the three mini-buses were full of well behaved, polite, intelligent, switched on and very able teenagers; the complete opposite of everything the media would have you believe of “our youth of today”.  I guess the good things in society will never get reported the way the bad does.

Just so you’re under no illusions, we’ve got super young people in our country, we ought to celebrate that more often!

I hope you enjoyed my scribblings ….

Next walk after these 3 outings = 20090508_Park Wood-Bluebells Walk With Dad.

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20090418-am_Mam Tor to Lose Hill Ridge Walk and Castleton

20090418-am _Mam Tor to Lose Hill Ridge Walk and Castleton

When : 18th April 2009

Who : A group of young people on an outdoor activities weekend including me helping out with adult leadership and supervision

Where : Hope Valley, Derbyshire, Peak District, England.

Maps : 1:25000 OS Explorer Map OL1 – The Peak District-Dark Peak Area.

Start Point : 124,832

End Point : 162, 825

Approx Distance : 5.4 miles, 8.6 km

Heights up : 1020 ft (about 310 m)

Heights down : 1750 ft (about 533m)

Parking : There’s a car park just to the south of Rushup Edge/Mam Tor off the Castleton to Chapel-en-le-Frith Road.

Summary :- Mam Tor, Hollins Cross, Back Tor, Lose Hill (Ward’s Piece), Castleton, Pindale Farm Camp Site (near Hope Cement Works).

The massed ensemble of adults and young people (or if you like trainee adults) gathered in the car park just outside the bunk barn after breakfast. Hanging around for everyone and everything to be ready allowed a little time to take in the views across the valley, affording a good proportion of where the morning walk would go; including the flanks of Lose Hill and the ridge from Mam Tor.

Somehow, we morphed from one big group into three separate entities …One set disappeared on mountain bikes (heading up towards Pin Dale) to do some off road cycling; another group departed in a mini-bus for Bamford Rocks for some climbing and the last group (with me) piled into another mini-bus to head off for our nice little morning hill walk. We’d all arranged to meet back at the camp site around about lunch time to swap activities.

After driving down to the Village of Hope (leaving the cement works chimney behind), we turned left, passed through Castleton (on the A6187) and then headed up the spectacular gorge of Winnats Pass. It was so impressive that my daughter Katie says she can’t even remember it some 6-months later!, so much for youth … still, I’ve always liked geography and limestone gorges kind of do it for me. It’s not a long drive, but it’s well worth doing, just for its own sake, just remember to use low gears on the steep bits!. At the top of the pass we turned a sharp right and then a left heading towards Chapel-en-le-Frith. Just a few hundred yards along here on the right is a large car-park which is where we started the walk from.

After parking, we set off, heading uphill to meet a minor road where it passes through a gap in the hills heading towards Edale. Almost immediately we took a path to the right onto a wide made-up path to climb a set of steps up onto Mam Tor. Straight away even before gaining much height views started to open up. Off to the west is Rushup Edge which has a superb path running along it’s crest, but that wasn’t for this weekend, although it did look most inviting … perhaps one for another day.

To the north the views into Edale are superb. The minor road descending the hillside leads the eye down into the valley from where the broad expanse of Kinder Scout looms above, the start of The Dark Peak Proper. Probably our most famous long distance path, The Pennine Way, starts in Edale Village to head up onto the plateau spread out in all its glory way off in front of us.

  

It’s a short sharp little climb up the steps to the cobbled top of Mam Tor, the summit marked with a trig’ point and it certainly made one or two of the kids puff a bit. However, the views are fantastic in all directions and everyone was in high spirits despite the chilly and quite strong breeze. The sun however was desperately trying to break through the cloud cover, spreading a hazy light all over the valley below … a promise of a good day ahead.

Leaving the top of Mam Tor, we took the very obvious flag-stoned path dropping away along the crest of the ridge heading eastwards. In terms of map reading you can’t get much easier than this, which is brill’ as it allows all your time for just walking, chatting and taking in the views. I love this ridge, with Edale and The Dark Peak to the north; the ridge stretching ahead to the east; the Hope Valley and The White Peak to the south and behind to the west, the sweep of the path back up to Mam Tor. The east face of “The Mother Hill” has slipped away into the valley in a series of massive landslips. So much so that the old road from Castleton is now totally defunct, now superseded by the Winnats Pass road we’d used earlier in the morning.

The ridge itself is a couple of miles or so long and the path rolls along the crest in a series of drops and rises. After Mam Tor, the first staging point reached is Hollins Cross. This is a low point on the ridge and several paths converge here from both The Hope and Edale valleys. From here the path takes a bit of a climb where it’s called Barker Bank following the line of a wall that’s seen better days.

Upon reaching the top of Barker Bank, the next little climb comes into view … Back Tor, and Craig’s Tree which I’ll explain in a mo’. There’s a small drop before rising gently towards Back Tor to eventually climb quite steeply to the top of the crag jutting out above the Edale Valley.

  

By now there were quite a few people about, heading both in our and opposite directions and ascending routes up the hillside from the valleys on either side.  

A few years ago, I did this section of the walk with my family, where my son Craig (he was maybe 5 or 6 years old) taking a shine to the lone tree near the top decided to RUN up the hill to beat the rest of us to the tree. To this day, this little lone conifer has been known to us as Craig’s Tree. There are now two sets of walkers that now know this name too … perhaps in years to come it will come into common use and no-one will know it’s origins. I think our little naming is quite apt, as Craig’s name has its roots in meaning Crag or Rock … and that’s exactly what it’s perched on top of.

The top of Back Tor is a super place to sit for a while, maybe to take some refreshments, catch your breath again and maybe drink in the views, especially over Edale. After a short break and a regroup we set off again still on the ridge top, still with brilliant views and happily chatting amongst ourselves and offering cheery hello’s to fellow walkers. It wasn’t long before we reached the summit of Lose Hill (also known as Ward’s Piece). A look back showed virtually the entire walk done so far. Although the clouds had broken up quite considerably, it was still quite breezy and there was a definite chill on the wind, so we all hunkered down in a hollow for lunch and a chat. Just above us set into the rocks is a brass plaque pretty much hidden away from the main route over the top, and certainly not visible from the direction post thingy on the broad summit. I’ve been on this hill numerous times and I can’t recall ever seeing this plaque before …. I especially like the sentiment at the end “A RAMBLER MADE IS A MAN IMPROVED”.

Lose Hill really marks the end of the ridge and it’s rough slopes drop in all directions. Our route descended to the south to pick up a series of paths and farm tracks through much more gentle farmland in the Hope Valley, There were stands of trees, walls, fences, streams, stiles and gates, side paths and buildings to pass … quite pretty, but I needed to concentrate much more on the map reading now as we zigged and zagged across towards Castleton. We’d obviously not worked the younger members of the group hard enough as they were still rather boisterous at one point trying to knock us oldies off some stepping stones into a small stream we had to cross.

Once into the village, we had to cross the main road and we joined the throng of other visitors to walk up and past the church in the village centre. This really is a very, very, popular place to visit and understandably so. I’ve stayed at the youth hostel here several times as it is a superb base for walking. There are a smattering of shops (albeit mostly touristy) and a number of pubs, all in all a perfectly charming peak village.

We soon reached a small triangular green with a stone cross and a tall tree. From here we had a section of road walking, climbing out of the village heading eastwards, towards Hope, on a minor road. The lane soon levelled out and became more rural, leaving the outskirts of Castleton behind. The views to the north had opened up again, the full ridge from Mam Tor to Lose Hill forming the horizon showing the majority of the walk done so far. The valley bottom had a spring vibrancy in the sun; greens of various hues bursting out from their winter slumbers …. I do like spring! I think it’s probably my favourite season.

   

As the lane dropped ahead of us, the chimney of Hope Cement Works came into view marking our destination … our camp site nestled underneath the ugly but somehow quite compelling structure.

And that was it …. Our group had completed the walk, I hope with a degree of satisfaction, their next activity was to be the off road cycling.

Just as an aside, if you wanted to make this into a circular walk, it’s quite easy as there are various paths from Castleton that can be taken to climb back up to the car park near Mam Tor; including the superb Cave Dale, The old broken road and another that passes in front of the famous show caves associated with Castleton.

If you’re wondering, we got the mini-bus back by two of the adult leaders driving up in the car, so that the bus could be driven back down again … it didn’t take long before we were all ready for the afternoon activities.

Hope you enjoed my scribblings, Gary.

 ….

Thanks to Kev747 for the use of his pic’s of Winnats pass from his photostream on the flickr photo hosting website.

….

Other walks of this weekend =

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/20090418_win-hill-ladybower-bamford-rocks-walk/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/23/20090419-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton-reprise/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/26/20090417-19_peak-district-weekend-an-overview/

Next walk after these 3 outings = 20090508_Park Wood-Bluebells Walk With Dad.

20090419-am_Mam Tor to Lose Hill Ridge Walk and Castleton (reprise)

20090419_Mam Tor to Lose Hill Ridge Walk and Castleton (reprise)

When : 20th April 2009

Who : A group of young people on an outdoor activities weekend including me helping out with adult leadership and supervision

Where : Hope Valley, Derbyshire, Peak District, England.

Maps : 1:25000 OS Explorer Map OL1 – The Peak District-Dark Peak Area.

Start Point : 124, 832

End Point : 162, 825

Approx Distance : 5.4 miles, 8.6 km

Heights up : 1020 ft (about 310 m)

Heights down : 1750 ft (about 533m)

Parking : There’s a car park just to the south of Rushup Edge/Mam Tor off the Castleton to Chapel-en-le-Frith Road.

Yesterday’s morning walk was deemed such a success [both logistically and from a strenuosity point of view] that we decided to do exactly the same walk again with the last of the three groups. They’d done the off-road cycling and climbing on the Saturday, meaning they were now due to do the walk on the Sunday morning.

We all gathered outside and once again morphed into the three groups and it wasn’t long afterwards that we’d once again driven up through Winnats Pass to the car park near Rushup Edge/Mam Tor.

After parking, we set off, uphill for the sharpish, but short, climb to the top of Mam Tor. The day had a different feel to it than the morning before, much calmer and hazier and the breeze had dropped considerably. The views (obviously) were exactly the same as the day before, but the change in the weather had altered the feel of the vistas. The edges of the hills were softer and somehow everything seemed farther away. I don’t think I’ve ever before walked exactly the same route on consecutive days and I found the differences to be quite surprising!  

The youngsters had a different approach to the walk as well, much quicker when walking, but wanting longer rests when they stopped. It was quite interesting seeing how this panned out, as the less fit struggled a little more on the uphill sections. I wouldn’t say there was any real difference in the overall abilities of the groups, so maybe the pace taken and distance between members had both a physiological and psychological affect on the back-markers. I certainly had to work harder on this second walk in encouraging one or two on the uphill sections. This wasn’t a problem (it’s what leading is all about), just an interesting observation.

Another interesting observation I noticed, the individuals who struggled the most (on both days) were, by and large, the ones eating sweets and chocolate the most often … errrmm … there’s got to be link there somewhere.

One difference that’s also worth noting is the way the two groups descended off Lose Hill. At one point there was a quite steep grassy slope. The Saturday party sort of wandered down chatting away quite happily, the Sunday group decided to lie on the ground and roll down bumping over the rough grassy tussocks, each other, their ruck-sacks and sheep droppings as they went … you’d think they were 5-year olds not in their early teens. Now I’ll tell you the main difference between the groups … maybe you’ve guessed already … Yep, the Saturday lot were all girls and the Sunday bunch, all boys!!! That obviously says something about gender differences … I’ll not say anymore, but leave it to you to make your own conclusions.

During the day there were certainly many more people about, the ridge between Mam Tor and Lose Hill especially was very busy, in both directions, obviously Sunday is used more for leisure time and the weather had improved considerably, probably one of the best days of the year to date.

I especially liked the silhouettes of the passing groups along the edge … people look so little and insignificant in the landscape.

  As well as the increased numbers of walkers, there were a good handful of para-gliders and hang-gliders throwing themselves off the top of Mam Tor to soar up on the thermals rising from the valley below. It’s quite a common sight here, but quite worth remarking none-the-less.

  

  

  

My earlier post <link> has much more in the way of route description, so I’ll just give a bit of a quick summary here …

  • Car Park just to the south of the gap between Rushup edge and Mam Tor and steps up to Mam Tor Summit.
  • Views back over Rushup Edge  and into the Edale and Hope Valleys and beyond.
  • Drop eastwards along the ridge down to Hollins Cross.
  • Rise over Barker Bank to the short climb up Back Tor.
  • Craig’s Tree on Back Tor (see earlier post for why it’s called this!).
  • Lose Hill Summit (otherwise known as Ward’s piece) followed by a drop through low level countryside into Castleton including views of Peveril Castle.
  • Walk through Castleton Village.
  • Minor road to Pindale Camp Site.

And that was it …. The second group had completed the walk, and it was time to head home, once we’d loaded the mini-buses to the gunnels again.

Just as an aside, if you wanted to make this into a circular walk, it’s quite easy as there are various paths from Castleton that can be taken to climb back up to the car park near Mam Tor; including the superb Cave Dale, The old broken road and another that passes in front of the famous show caves associated with Castleton.

Hope you enjoyed my scribblings,

Bye for Now, Gary.

 ….

Other walks of this weekend =

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/24/20090418-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/20090418_win-hill-ladybower-bamford-rocks-walk/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/26/20090417-19_peak-district-weekend-an-overview/

Next walk after these 3 outings = 20090508_Park Wood-Bluebells Walk With Dad.

20090418_Win Hill – Ladybower – Bamford Rocks Walk

20090418_Win Hill – Ladybower – Bamford Rocks Walk.

When : 18th April 2009

Who : Me and Lorne …. 2 grown up helpers not needed for an afternoon during an outdoor activities weekend for a group of youngsters from the Rugby area.

Where : Hope Valley, Derbyshire, Peak District, England.

Maps : 1:25000 OS Explorer Map OL1 – The Peak District-Dark Peak Area.

Start Point : 162, 825

End Point : 216, 839

Approx Distance : 6.2 miles, 10 km

Heights up : 1920 ft (about 585 m)

Heights down : 1450 ft (about 440m)

Parking : We started the walk at the campsite we were staying at, so no public parking but there is parking in Hope Village (quite near the church I think).

I had offered my services to the group that were due to do walking as their Saturday afternoon session (I think they’d already done Climbing during the morning and were due to off road cycle on Sunday morning) … Anyway, they decided that there were enough older people amongst themselves that they didn’t need me, nor the help of another adult helper (Lorne) which left us at a bit of a loose end. So I found a quiet(ish) corner in the campsite car park for a peruse of my map and quickly formulated a plan for an afternoon walk. The idea was to drop into Hope Village, pick up one of the routes up to the top of Win Hill, drop down towards the dam holding back the waters of Ladybower Reservoir and then work out a route across the lowland farmland back to Hope maybe using a section of The Derwent Valley Heritage Way. It was a very loose plan and I just decided that as it was turning out to be a nice afternoon weather-wise that I’d just kind of let the walk evolve as I went. I explained my thoughts to Lorne, who quickly decided to join me. So once the three groups had set off in their various directions, we too moved off,  leaving the campsite deserted. We had no choice but to start on a minor road for about a mile to get us to the village of Hope. Now I don’t particularly like road walking and I try to avoid it as much as possible but sometimes it’s necessary and in fact it didn’t seem so bad, probably helped by the sunshine and good views across The Hope Valley. Also walking with someone I didn’t really know left the opportunity for our chat to go in all sorts of directions. Even walking over a mineral line and a road entrance into The Hope Cement Works complex didn’t really detract from enjoying the freedom of not having the responsibility of having the youngsters with us.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed leading the morning walk, there’s a huge satisfaction in leading walks, but it’s different to walking on your own or in small groups. The pace can quicken and you can be more flexible in adapting routes etc. this soon happened after we’d reached Hope. As, after crossing the A6187 main road I took a detour into the local grocery store to pick up some extra provisions for the walk … Can you imagine trying to do that quickly and efficiently with a bunch of teenagers in tow …. No nor me!

We then picked up the Edale road heading north for maybe 500 yards or so before branching right down a side track to go under a railway where we had a choice of routes to ascend Winhill.

Option-1 was to take a long route at a relatively gentle angle northwards for a mile or so, before almost completely doubling back to rise up and along the ridge of Hope Brink to Thornhill Brink and Winhill Pike, maybe another mile and a half.

Option-2 was a much more direct route. Taking a right along a track near the railway before turning left rising quickly up to Twitchill Farm and thence angling steeply up the hillside beneath Thornhill Brink to arrive at  Winhill Pike in a little more than a mile, less than half the distance of option-1. 

After a little deliberation we settled on option-2 and set off through quite nice gentle green farmland, taking the farm track up to Twitchill farm. I had to stop to take the obligatory photo of some rough cut logs piled up by the side of the track. At the farm the terrain steepened greatly and the ridge top we were heading for disappeared as we climbed.

The lush green lowland fields quickly and dramatically changed to a rough heathland of course grasses and heather as we climbed. My fitness levels that had been perfectly fine all morning and during the afternoon up until now, started to fail me somewhat, my legs struggling to find a rhythm on the steeper ground. However, I put my head down and put in some real work, which soon paid dividends … My pace began to quicken to a level I was happy with and it wasn’t long before the slope eased especially after we passed through the broken-down line of a dry-stone wall as our destination of Winhill pike came into view. Seeing where you’re heading for can be a huge boost as it gives a target to aim for and ground covered is a tangible measure of success.

We reached the crest of Thornhill bank and from here it was easy going, even the little craggy climb up the tor of Winhill Pike. The views down to Ladybower Reservoir and beyond to The Dark Peak are stunning from here and I was soon asked by other walkers to take a couple of picture of them with the vista behind. They then returned the favour, with me and Lorne proudly propped up on the summit trig’ point. It’d be interesting to know just how many snap shots of people stood next to these let’s face it rather ugly concrete obelisks have ever been taken.

Looking eastwards, we could look over Bamford Moor, and it was there that one of our groups was doing their climbing, only about a mile or so away as the crow flies. Their mini-bus was to be parked on a minor road (New Road) just to the south of the small line of a rocky outcrop (Bamford Edge). It was now that we used the flexibility of route taking talked about earlier and we resolved to pick up our pace and walk over there to find the climbers and in the process get a lift back to the camp-site.

This wasn’t really a cheat (if that’s what you’re thinking) as it involved a very steep descent through the forest of Winhill Plantation and Parkin Clough to then cross the dam holding back the waters of Ladybower Reservoir and then a section of road walking uphill to hopefully find the mini-bus and the party of climbers, before they packed up and set off for the campsite.

I’ve kind of given the route away now, but suffice to say the drop through the forest was indeed very steep, almost painfully so as the path rapidly crosses contours by the side of a stream. With just a little imagination the path dropping into the trees could have been the entrance into the dark depths of Fanghorn Forest … could there be Orcs or goblins, hoards of giant man-eating spiders or benevolent elves hidden within ?  (if you’ve read The Hobbit + Lord of the Rings you’ll know what I’m rambling on about here). Sorry, I’ve gone a bit off-story but it does make you wonder if Mr Tolkien had a place like this in mind when he wrote his tome of Middle Earth.

Back to the walk … After a good length of descent we picked up a contouring track that soon brought us to the western end of the Ladybower dam, the light and airy open expanse of water a total contrast to the claustrophobic conifer forest. Crossing the dam afforded super views north to The Dark peak Hills rising out of the lake and to the south over the tailbay and down the upper reaches of The Derwent Valley. The grassy southerly facing slope of the dam was covered in yellow dandelions … very pretty.

  

  

From the eastern end of the dam we just had to pound tarmac, firstly south by the side of the A6013 and then branching left onto New Road and a slog upwards until we found the mini-bus …. Hurray it was still there. We then quizzed a couple of very fit looking guys who’d obviously been climbing on Bamford edge and they gave us some rough directions to where a group of young people matching the description of our colleagues were on the crag. So we set off to find them, which we did with ease getting some more super views along the way. Not long after our meeting, the climbers packed up and we all set off across the moor back to the mini-bus for the drive back to Hope and Pindale Farm to cook a well earned dinner but not before stopping off in Bamford Village for an ice-cream/ice-lolly for everyone, a suitable reward for a fantastic days walking.

Just as an aside, if you want to use this as the basis of a circular walk, there is car parking in the villages of Hope and Castleton and there are numerous footpaths shown on the map that criss-cross the landscape between Bamford village and Hope/Castleton. If a pub is important to you on a walk there are several marked at intervals on the map throughout the Derwent and Hope Valleys … Having not used ANY of them this week-end I’ll have to let you do your own research on suitability.

Hope you enjoyed my scribblings,

TTFN, Gary

 ….

Other walks of this weekend =

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/24/20090418-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/23/20090419-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton-reprise/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/26/20090417-19_peak-district-weekend-an-overview/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/20090418-20_bamford-rocks-open-access-information/

Next walk after these 3 outings = 20090508_Park Wood-Bluebells Walk With Dad.

20090417-19_Peak District Weekend – Accommodation

20090417-19_Peak District Weekend – Accommodation

When : 17th to 19th April 2009

Who : A group of young people on an outdoor activities weekend including me helping out with adult leadership and supervision.

Where : Hope Valley, Derbyshire, Peak District, England.

I was asked to help out with adult supervision and leadership of a couple or three walks for some young people from a local youth group. For more info see my associated posts for an overview of the week-end and the walks I helped lead.

On the Friday evening, we travelled up to Hope in the Derbyshire Peak district in three mini-buses and a car … all absolutely packed to the gunnels with people, people’s kit, climbing stuff, food and a load of mountain bikes lashed to the roof-rack of one the buses.

We stayed at PINDALE FARM OUTDOOR CENTRE, where their sign says “ACCOMMODATION FOR THE OUTDOORS  BUNKHOUSE  B&B  CAMPING” and to misquote that rather annoying Ronseal advert, it does exactly what it says on the sign.

We found the campsite quite easily and we unloaded into the 3-bunk-rooms that had been booked in advance. Each room had basic (very basic) cooking and washing up facilities, a large table for meals, a shower and a huge bunk-bed construction with just mattresses supplied. There was metered electricity “fed” by tokens obtained from the proprietors.

As I said above, it was basic, but perfectly fine for our needs and the youthful element of our party were soon making themselves at home, spreading sleeping bags out etc. …

It’s amazing how quickly a neat, almost empty, room can look like a bomb has dropped in just a matter of minutes! …. and even more amazing how it could happen in three rooms almost simultaneously.

There were a fair few people camping at the site as well, and from a distance the ground looked fairly level and grassy.

It was quite surreal seeing the array of tents positioned so closely under the main chimney and processing plant of the Hope Cement Works, a VERY close neighbour to the campsite; literally no more than a couple of hundred yards away on the other side of a strip of trees on an earthen bank.

     

Anyway, enough of that … if you want some more info’ about the camp site + accommodation, I found the following web site, which I hope may be of use; please note, it is someone else’s web-site so I can’t verify the info’ although it does ring-true relative to our stay … http://www.independenthostelguide.com/selected-accommodation.php?area=72

There are a plethora of other sites that listed on the web when I googled “Pindale Farm”. Pages upon pages of links appeared with reviews, maps on how to get there, etc., etc., etc., so I don’t really need to give any more details here.     

Bye for Now, Gary.

I hope you enjoyed my scribblings ….

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/26/20090417-19_peak-district-weekend-an-overview/

Next walk after this week-end = 20090508_Park Wood-Bluebells Walk With Dad.

20090417-19_Bamford Rocks – Open Access Information

20090417-19_Bamford Rocks – Open Access Information

When : 17th – 19th April 2009

Where : Hope Valley, Derbyshire, Peak District, England.

Maps : 1:25000 OS Explorer Map OL1 – The Peak District-Dark Peak Area.

Whilst planning/researching potential walks for the week-end, I contacted The Ranger Service for The Peak National Park. I knew the week-end’s climbing sessions were to take place on Bamford Edge, but I wanted further information about walking routes around here and if access was allowed to the surrounding moorland. In the end I didn’t really use the info I got back to any great extent, but I thought I would share the info’ I got back, so with no further pre-amble, the answer I received is :-

Hello, thanks for your enquiry.

Although you are correct in your understanding that Bamford Edge is covered by the CROW Act, the landowner has exercised his discretion to close the access land on week days and some weekend days between 15th May and 17th June. You won’t be able to access the edge during that time. With regard to the Access points you can walk right along the edge (outside this closure period), from the access points at Cutthroat Bridge (SK215874 ), Hetherdene Car Park, ( at SK 205860 ) and the southern end of the edge on New Road (SK216839). There is a fairly clear path along the edge, but you’d better take a map to be on the safe side …..

 

The following link was supplied for further Peak District info. And as it’s got a .gov.uk ending I guess it’s gonna be as accurate if not more so than any other web-site :- www.peakdistrict.gov.uk

As a final comment ….

PLEASE NOTE, THIS IS ACCESS LAND ONLY, GRANTED UNDER NEW LEGISLATION … There are no official rights of way onto Bamford Edge or across Bamford Moor, save for one path running north from near Leeside Road/Bamford Clough across Moscar Moor to rise up to the northern reaches of Stanage Edge. If you do use the new access rules, please respect the land and the rights of the landowners. Use your hard-won rights properly and hopefully goodwill might break out all over our fantastic and diverse country.

 ….

Walks done during this weekend =

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/24/20090418-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/20090418_win-hill-ladybower-bamford-rocks-walk/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/23/20090419-am_mam-tor-to-lose-hill-ridge-walk-and-castleton-reprise/

https://tothehills.wordpress.com/2009/11/26/20090417-19_peak-district-weekend-an-overview/

Next walk after these 3 outings = 20090508_Park Wood-Bluebells Walk With Dad.